All four Labour leadership candidates on their visions for education – interviews

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 07:09
Andy Burnham, Yvette Cooper, Jeremy Corbyn and Liz Kendall discuss their views on grammar schools, the Ebacc, and giving local communities responsibility for education

Education was remarkably low key throughout the general election campaign. Even the shadow education secretary, Tristram Hunt, suggested last month on these pages that the Labour party had failed to project a strong radical message to the voters. And apart from a few skirmishes and soundbites over free schools, and early branding of each of the four candidates on the spectrum of “new” to “old” Labour on education policy, the subject seems so far to be getting an equally low profile in the campaigns of the candidates standing to be the new Labour leader.

So we decided to ask the candidates some questions. Why did Labour fail to put education at the heart of the election campaign? Has it provided an effective opposition to Michael Gove’s and Nicky Morgan’s policies? What would change if they were to become Labour party leader?

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Categories: Education news feeds

The price is wrong: survey exposes lack of personal finance knowledge in UK

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 07:00

British people drastically underestimate cost of raising children and saving for a pension . Most know the price of a pint of milk, though

British people think the cost of raising a child is four times less than the actual amount, according to a survey by Ipsos Mori that suggests the public’s financial knowledge is sketchy at best.

Related: Most of what Britons think they know about personal finance is wrong

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Categories: Education news feeds

Bullets banish books in South Sudan as education becomes a casualty of war | James Copnall

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 07:00

Slim progress on education is set back as soldiers requisition school buildings and fighting forces children to flee, but some are returning to the classroom

At the end of a school day in the South Sudanese capital, Juba, young girls in light brown uniforms walk home, chatting in the late-afternoon sun. The scene should be repeated all over the country but over the past year and a half the civil war has forced hundreds of thousands of children out of school nationwide.

Education is one of the hidden casualties of South Sudan’s latest conflict, which began in December 2013 and shows little sign of ending. School buildings have been requisitioned by soldiers, pupils and their teachers have been press-ganged into armed groups, and an estimated 400,000 children have been forced out of school.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Most of what Britons think they know about personal finance is wrong

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 07:00

People’s understanding of the cost of important life events is way out. This matters, so what can be done about it?

The average person in Britain has a poor understanding of many aspects of personal finance, according to research.

In particular, we grossly underestimate the cost of big life events such as having children, going to university and retiring.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Michael Rosen issues his end of term report: Nicola Morgan is coasting

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 07:00

Education secretary Nicky Morgan’s performance in maths, media studies and English gives cause for concern

Nicola’s end of term report is a matter of some concern. Comments from her subject teachers are giving me very real worries.

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Categories: Education news feeds

There is a third way universities could take, between state and market

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 06:45
We need to increase differentiation – not by fighting over funding but by building networks and working together in solidarity

Everyone seems to agree we need greater variety in higher education – world-class research universities, regional universities focusing more on teaching, specialist institutions and, even, some private providers of professional training without too many academic frills. The buzzword is differentiation. The implied criticism is that what we have instead is a one-size-fits-all approach.

But the evidence is rather thin. Most universities have their own distinctive missions and priorities, whether it’s performing wonderfully in the Research Excellence Framework, reaching out to more diverse student constituencies, or feeding the future workforce. No one imagines Cambridge and Coventry universities are trying to do the same thing. Also, universities are now so big that they are often highly differentiated internally. Top research departments coexist with enterprise units. Business schools live alongside history departments.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Vocational qualifications and degree outcomes

Higher Education Academy - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 09:02
Monday, 6 July, 2015

Students with vocational qualifications are less likely to get a First or a 2.1, research published today shows, with the differences in degree outcome greatest at research-intensive universities.

Categories: Education news feeds

Vocational qualifications and degree outcomes

Higher Education Academy - Mon, 06/07/2015 - 09:02
Monday, 6 July, 2015

Students with vocational qualifications are less likely to get a First or a 2.1, research published today shows, with the differences in degree outcome greatest at research-intensive universities.

Categories: Education news feeds