Story of cities #32: Jane Jacobs v Robert Moses, battle of New York's urban titans

The Guardian Unlimited - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 07:30

When city planning supremo Robert Moses proposed a road through Greenwich Village in 1955, he met opposition from one particularly feisty local resident: Jane Jacobs. It was the start of a decades-long struggle for swaths of New York

In 1961, Bennett Cerf, one of the founders of the publishing firm Random House, sent a copy of a new book by Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of American Cities, to the legendary city planner Robert Moses. Moses’s reply was curt:

Dear Bennett,

I am returning the book you sent me. Aside from the fact that it is intemperate and inaccurate, it is also libelous. I call your attention, for example, to page 131. Sell this junk to someone else.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Has the way universities teach economics changed enough?

The Guardian Unlimited - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 07:00

Universities came under attack for failing to predict the 2008 financial crisis, and students demanded change. Have economics departments risen to the challenge?

In the years following the global financial crisis, the academic study and teaching of economics has come in for a bashing. In fact, it has faced the kind of fundamental criticism rarely directed towards entire disciplines.

The apparent failure of economists to predict, let alone prevent, the 2008 crash has led to accusations that conventional economic teaching cannot adequately explain the complex dynamics and risks of modern economies.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Warning on subject choice at 16

BBC - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 01:47
Too many university applicants realise too late they picked the wrong school subjects at 16, says the consumer group Which?
Categories: Education news feeds

Ofsted withdraws report accusing nursery of cultural diversity failings

The Guardian Unlimited - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 00:46

Town and Country Kiddies Nursery in Market Rasen had been downgraded over concerns children missed out on opportunities to learn about diversity

An Ofsted report that allegedly criticised a nursery for failing to teach children about cultural diversity has been withdrawn, the watchdog has said.

Town and Country Kiddies Nursery in Chestnut House, Market Rasen, had reportedly received feedback that it was not providing enough opportunities for its children to “learn about people who are different to themselves”.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Many children in care denied mental health treatment, says report

The Guardian Unlimited - Thu, 28/04/2016 - 00:01

Vulnerable young people without permanent placement not receiving vital support, warns Commons committee

Children in care are being denied access to mental health services in some cases because they have not got a stable placement, according to a report.

One 16-year-old in foster care had to wait more than two and a half years to access Child and Mental Health Services (Camhs) because she was moved 13 times during that period.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Schools plan could lead to 10,000 multi-academy trusts, MPs told

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 20:25

Nicky Morgan blames ‘fear of the unknown’ for schools’ reluctance, and admits primary teachers have had a challenging year

A profusion of 10,000 multi-academy trusts running schools in England could result from the government’s plans to turn every state school into an academy, the education secretary, Nicky Morgan, has conceded to MPs.

Appearing before parliament’s education committee, Morgan gave few clues on which parts of the government’s education white paper would become legislation, but appeared to be firm that all schools would become academies by 2022.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Morgan offers no academy concessions

BBC - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 18:25
Education Secretary Nicky Morgan offered MPs no compromises over controversial plans to force all of England's schools to become academies.
Categories: Education news feeds

Staff segregated by gender at some faith schools, says chief inspector

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 16:04

Ofsted chief Sir Michael Wilshaw warns segregation flouts requirement to promote fundamental British values in schools

Teachers and other staff at some independent faith schools are being segregated by gender, the chief inspector of schools, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has said in a letter to the education secretary.

In one case, staff at Rabia girls and boys school in Luton were segregated during whole-school training, with men in one room while the session was broadcast to women in a separate part of the school.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Reluctant writers? 10 top tips to help primary pupils write poetry

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 15:38

Choose one theme and act out a scene – children’s poet Kate Williams shares her techniques for helping young students discover their inner Wordsworth

Most key stage 2 teachers have pupils who balk at the prospect of writing a simple sentence, let alone an entire poem. But it doesn’t need to be overwhelming – lots of children love being creative with words, they just need a confidence boost. Here are 10 tried-and-tested techniques I’ve developed to help students get started.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Cameron hints at concession over councils working with schools

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 15:13

PM says although all schools will need to become academies, they can still get the support of local authorities if they want it

David Cameron has hinted at concessions on his plan to force all schools to become academies, saying they will still be able to work with councils.

He said further plans would be brought forward at the Queen’s speech next month, and suggested schools who wanted the support of local authorities would be able to receive it.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Corbyn questions Cameron on academies at PMQs – video

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 12:50

For the second week running, at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn focuses on education, grilling David Cameron about the government’s plan to force schools to become academies. Corbyn asks when will the government listen to the professionals and the public on such issues as health and education

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

University innocence projects: where are they now?

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 10:28

Only one conviction has ever been overturned on the strength of a university innocence project’s work in the UK – what’s going on? And what’s next for these projects?

Law students and academics from across England and Wales met at Cardiff University recently to mark the 10-year anniversary of its innocence project and discuss their work on arguably the most complex and intractable cases in our legal system. At the height of the so-called innocence movement, some 30 universities were assisting alleged victims of miscarriages of justice to clear their names.

It is almost 12 years since the pioneering University of Bristol innocence project launched and only one conviction has been overturned on the strength of a university application.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

How to juggle a full-time job and a part-time PhD

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 27/04/2016 - 07:00

My PhD and my business career are not connected and they are both demanding. But I’ve found there are benefits to my double life

I took a while to tell my colleagues that I was studying for a PhD in my spare time. I was concerned that they might question my ability to balance a full-time (and full-on) career with doctoral studies in a topic completely unrelated to the industry I work in.

But I began to realise that, although the topic I am exploring is not directly connected, the skills I am acquiring are hugely valuable. The process has given me new perspectives and added value in ways I had not expected.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Six-year-olds need delight, not drilling – this grammar regime is a farce | Angela Moore

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 16:14
As a teacher I’m glad the spelling, punctuation and grammar test had to be scrapped this year. We need to stop colluding with this damaging system

As a year two teacher, you get to watch as the scales of toddlerhood fall from the eyes of each child as they start to become themselves. At six or seven years old, they hang wide-eyed on your every word, their busy brains desperate to know what everything means and how it all works. It’s such a joyous job.

Related: Spelling test blunder as DfE publishes forthcoming paper online

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

The path to success doesn’t have to go through university | Helen Whitehouse

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 14:00
I’m proud of my friends who are graduating, but I quit university to make myself employable. Non-graduates often have practical career skills that could be more valuable

Most of my friends are finishing their last year at university, and my Facebook feed is now filled with pictures of dissertations – bound and covered and shiny, ready to be handed in – followed by pictures of fancy cocktails captioned #celebrations. It’s that time of year when everyone is handing in final essays and revising for exams. And research that suggests companies are making an effort to take on more graduates offers further reason for celebration.

But what about the many educated young people who don’t go on to further education?

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Schools minister's academy drops plans for longer day after protests

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 13:59

Parents complain 45-minute extension at Future Academies, established by Lord Nash and his wife, will exhaust pupils

An academy chain established by the schools minister has been forced to drop controversial plans to extend the day for children as young as five after protests from parents and teachers.

Future Academies in Pimlico, central London, which was set up by the academies minister Lord Nash and his wife Caroline, told parents in March that it expected to increase daily school hours by 45 minutes. It followed central government plans to do so, which were outlined in George Osborne’s budget.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

India 'sedition' students suspended

BBC - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 08:10
Two Indian students accused of sedition for helping organise a protest at Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University are suspended from campus.
Categories: Education news feeds

Government wins vote on child refugees

BBC - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 07:39
MPs vote against an attempt to force the government to allow 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees into the UK from Europe.
Categories: Education news feeds

Headteachers start fightback against government policy diktat

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 07:30

The Headteachers’ Roundtable is mounting a grassroots attack on government reforms to thrash out a different vision of education for the next decade

The standoff between Nicky Morgan and backbenchers over the recent white paper rumbles on. No one now knows to what extent the government is going to back track on its contentious vision for the future of the English school system.

Inevitably much of the criticism has focused on the plan to forcibly “academise” all schools. But for one group of heads, the white paper’s flaw is in the gaps. It is as much about what it fails to address as what it proposes to do.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds

Story of cities #30: how this Amsterdam inventor gave bike-sharing to the world

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 26/04/2016 - 07:30

In the 1960s, Luud Schimmelpennink devised the ‘white bike’ plan to counter the rise of pollution and cars. His invention has revolutionised public transport all over the world – so why has his cycle-loving home city never embraced it?

Take an old bicycle. Paint it white. Leave it anywhere in the city. Tell people to use it. This was the first urban bike-sharing concept in history. Launched in Amsterdam in the 1960s, it was called the Witte Fietsenplan (the “white bicycle plan”). And it was not a great success.

In fact, the plan was just another wild initiative by which Provo, an infamous group of Dutch anarchist activists, wanted to provoke the establishment and change society. But eventually the idea would revolutionise public transport across the world. Nowadays, hundreds of cities have bike-sharing systems, and the phenomenon is still growing.

Continue reading...
Categories: Education news feeds