A Nigerian child's tale: Confidant Danjuma Martins at 10 years old | Isaac Abrak

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 10:00

In 2005, the Guardian featured 10 newborns in countries across Africa. Five years later, we returned to talk to them and their parents. Now we revisit the 10-year-old Confidant to hear her story and learn more about the opportunities and challenges she and her family face

Confidant Danjuma Martins fidgets on the couch and hides her face shyly behind a decorative throw as she considers how to answer the question. Does she like her maternal great-aunt’s village in Kaduna state, where she has lived since 2012?

“I don’t like staying in the village,” the 10-year-old blurts out suddenly, in response to her mother’s gentle prodding. “[People] are wicked in the village, and they curse and fight.”

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Categories: Education news feeds

A Tanzanian child's tale: Zainab Salehe Abu at 10 years old | Sam Jones

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 10:00

In 2005, the Guardian featured 10 newborn babies in countries across Africa. Five years later, we returned to talk to them and their parents. Now we revisit the10-year-old Zainab to hear her story and learn more about the opportunities and challenges she and her family face

Zainab Salehe Abu, now a shy and slight 10-year-old, has three dreams. If she could, she would eat chicken and rice as often as she liked, see the lions, zebras and elephants in a national park, and, one day, become a teacher.

Related: Africa's children: 10 years on – interactive

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Categories: Education news feeds

A South African child's tale: Angel Siyavuya Swartbooi at 10 years old | David Smith

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 10:00

In 2005, Angel Siyavuya Swartbooi was one of 10 newborns from countries across Africa who were featured in the Guardian. Five years later, we returned to talk to them and their parents. Now we revisit Siya at 10 to hear his story and learn more about the opportunities and challenges he and his family face

Colourful paintings of an elephant, a giraffe, penguins, a zebra and a rainbow greet Angel Siyavuya Swartbooi every morning. They adorn the walls of Isiphiwo public primary school in Khayelitsha, where the 10-year-old – Siya, for short – is a pupil.

Maths is his favourite subject – “I love counting,” he says – but his real passion is football. “I’m a defender. I like it because it keeps me fit and I love running around. When I finish school, I want to play for Barcelona.”

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A Malawian child's tale: Innocent Smoke at 10 years old | John Vidal

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 10:00

In 2005, Innocent Smoke was one of 10 newborns from countries across Africa who were featured in the Guardian. Five years later, we returned to talk to them and their parents. Now we revisit the 10-year-old Innocent to hear his story and learn more about the opportunities and challenges he and his family face

Innocent Smoke, born in the shadow of Malawi’s biggest tobacco factory in 2005, is one of those rare African lads who love football but who have never watched it on television or even heard of Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo. Now he is fighting for his sight – a battle that may determine the rest of his life.

Nine years ago, Innocent’s family moved from a small farming community on the outskirts of the burgeoning capital, Lilongwe, to try their hand growing maize and tobacco in the rolling hills near the remote village of Simulemba, north of Kasungu, where land is good and still cheap.

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Categories: Education news feeds

What sort of back to school teacher are you? Take our test (no cheating)

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 08:00

Are you Mrs Organised, raring to get into the classroom, or Mr Relaxed who hits snooze too many times on the alarm clock?

A. Mainly having sleepless nights as you think about lesson planning and worry about whether you’ll get everything sorted in time.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Can you solve it? Professor Povey's perplexing problem

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 07:03

To solve the puzzle of the coin and the chessboard you need to throw money at the problem

Hello guzzlers,

This week’s puzzle is purloined (with permission) from the recently-published prime paperback, Professor Povey’s Perplexing Problems.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Secondary schools fail to get teenagers into work - despite booming jobs market

Telegraph - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 06:00
The study from the pro-free school charity the New Schools Network found that, in areas with failing secondary schools, young people aged between 16 and 18 were more likely to be unemployed than adults of all ages









Categories: Education news feeds

Our schools should be less like Singapore and more like Silicon Valley | Zoe Williams

The Guardian Unlimited - Mon, 31/08/2015 - 05:59
Pitting teachers against each other and setting unrealistic goals doesn’t work. As the tech giants have shown, the best results come from cooperation, not competition

We are on the brink of a crisis in teacher numbers. Apparently it’s harder to recruit when the country comes out of recession, since the profession loses its risk-takers. It doesn’t help one bit when the population insists on continuing to produce more children.

Related: Shortage of teachers set to spark new schools crisis

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Akram Khan: Choreographer says dance is 'as important as maths and being a doctor'

The Independent - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 19:25

Akram Khan, one of the most-acclaimed choreographers in the UK, has called for the Government to put dance in the curriculum saying it is as important as studying maths or medicine.











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Ucas is harming social mobility by blocking data on poor students, says senior MP

The Independent - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 18:37

A senior MP has joined the growing number of critics of the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (Ucas), the body that handles university applications, for refusing to disclose important data it holds on students from poor backgrounds.











Categories: Education news feeds

University to mark down students who say 'illegal immigrants' in class

The Independent - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 15:36

Professors at a US university have told students that they risk failing their assignments and even their semester if they use offensive or hateful language in class or submissions.











Categories: Education news feeds

High tuition fees are killing off student bands

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 13:00

Universities used to be a fertile breeding ground for UK bands, but today’s students can’t afford to dream of stardom

Queen, Pink Floyd, Coldplay, Blur, and the Chemical Brothers. Some of the biggest and most influential bands in the UK – and they all formed while at university.

More recently, the trend has changed. With the exception of Alt-J and London Grammar, there’s been a noticable lack of bands taking their sound from student halls to concert halls. University should be the perfect time for hobby players to practice, network, and take their bands to the next level – so whatever happened to great student bands?

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Categories: Education news feeds

Young face a bleak future in UK’s flawed jobs market

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 09:00
More than half of Britain’s graduates are in non-graduate jobs. Apprentice pay is pitifully low. The outlook is becoming truly disheartening

As the soggy end of summer makes way for autumn and a new academic year, it is traditionally a time for fresh starts and new hopes. Except with rising student debts and pitiful pay for apprentices, September has become a time for brave leaps in the dark.

When this year’s cohort of young adults embark on their studies, many will carry with them stories of older friends and siblings, long since graduated but still searching for decent work. Anecdotal evidence of graduates working in bars and as receptionists is well-known. Now it has been backed up by a damning report on the state of Britain’s jobs market. Researchers found that due to a mismatch between the number of university leavers and the jobs appropriate to their skills, more than half of the UK’s graduates are in non-graduate jobs. This is one of the highest rates in Europe.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Billions of pounds and millions of students – back to school in numbers

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 08:00

As around 10m pupils return to school in the UK this week, parents will spend £1.45bn on uniforms, sportswear, stationary, accessories and books

The summer holidays are coming to an end, which means millions of children and hundreds of thousands of teachers are gearing up for the new school year.

Here are some key numbers which shed light on the scale of going back to school, including how many teachers and students face another academic year, and the average price of school uniforms.

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Categories: Education news feeds

The new school terms requires a bit of bottle - cartoon

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 07:00

It’s not just pencil cases and glue sticks on a teacher’s back-to-school shopping list

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Categories: Education news feeds

The week in TV: Educating Cardiff; Resistance; Soup Cans & Superstars: How Pop Art Changed the World

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 07:00
The work of inspired teachers in Wales was matched by tales of teen courage in the excellent Resistance. Meanwhile, a hero of British art was given his due

Educating Cardiff (C4) | All 4
Resistance (More4) | All 4
Soup Cans & Superstars: How Pop Art Changed the World (BBC4) iPlayer

As ever in the terrific Bafta-nominated Educating… strand, it was all about getting away from the statistics. After a mind-altering two weeks of hearing obfuscation over Labour membership figures finally man up and morph into simple, honest, gruesome twisted lies, it was a necessary delight to be reminded that stats tell only one story. The truth tells another.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Blinded by technology: has our belief in Silicon Valley led the world astray?

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 07:00
In Geek Heresy, computer expert Kentaro Toyama warns against our over-reliance on technology and explains why people, not smart tools, are the key to social change

When Microsoft programmer Kentaro Toyama was sent by his employers to India in 2004, charged with using technology to improve education, he expected to swoop in armed with gadgets and effect whizzy social change. It didn’t quite pan out like that. Toyama had some early successes at Microsoft Research India, including the invention of a device that allowed multiple mice-wielding pupils to control one computer at the same time. (MultiPoint, a problem-fixer for classrooms that had too few computers, won awards.) But he quickly came to see that technology was not the “magic cure” export his employers – and, indeed, many in Silicon Valley – seemed to expect.

In his new book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology, he writes that this was “hard to take. I was a computer scientist, a Microsoft employee, and the head of a group that aimed to find digital solutions for the developing world. I wanted nothing more than to see innovation triumph… But exactly where the need was greatest, technology seemed unable to make a difference.” He worked in schools that had been given computers but had no tech support, the broken-down hardware quickly ending up stacked in cupboards. He watched teachers struggle to cope with screen-enthused kids, for whom “a computer was less a help, more hindrance”.

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Categories: Education news feeds

The Observer view on the teaching shortage | Observer editorial

The Guardian Unlimited - Sun, 30/08/2015 - 00:05
The government urgently needs to do more to address this growing problem

Summer is almost over: parents will be spending the bank holiday weekend sorting through school uniforms as children enjoy their last days of freedom and teachers revisit lesson plans. But figures reported last week suggest that the nation’s teaching shortage is getting worse: growing numbers of children will be returning to the classroom to be taught by non-specialists and supply teachers.

Teaching unions have long warned of a brewing crisis, with several factors coinciding to create a perfect storm. The number of school places needed is forecast to rise by more than a million over the next decade. But teacher recruitment has been falling since 2010 – around 10% of teacher training places will remain unfilled this year – and one in 10 teachers left the profession last year, the highest rate for a decade.

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Categories: Education news feeds