VIDEO: How will schools prevent extremism?

BBC - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 08:16
From Wednesday schools will be held legally responsible for preventing pupils from being drawn into terrorism, but how will they tackle the issue?
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Government policy will seal the mouths of Muslim pupils | Owen Jones

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 08:00

Legislation to tackle radicalisation runs the risk of silencing and alienating children in our classrooms

If you care about children’s development and combating extremism, this is a story that should alarm you. A teacher at a London state school largely catering for Muslim girls runs an activity each week: pupils suggest items in the news to talk about, and the class has a discussion. But a week after the Charlie Hebdo atrocity, nobody brought it up. When the teacher spoke to students, she found out why: “Our mothers told us, ‘Don’t talk about that – they’ll put us on a register.’”

The teacher in the story didn’t think any of her students would have said they supported the terrorists, but thought some students might have said drawing the prophet Muhammad should be illegal; others might have felt less strongly. But the opportunity to have the discussion was lost because these pupils thought they would be criminalised.

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Categories: Education news feeds

Universities push for higher fees

BBC - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 07:52
Universities are calling for the limit on tuition fees in England to be lifted so that they could rise above the current £9,000 maximum.
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Five useful ways teachers can help pupils transition to secondary school

The Guardian Unlimited - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 07:00

Assistant headteacher Vicky Horne shares her tips on how to make the move from primary to secondary education seamless for nervous young students

There it sits in pride of place on every mantelpiece: the perennial snapshot of a nervous 11-year-old in an oversized uniform, smiling for the camera but not quite ready for their first day at secondary school.

It’s a huge responsibility for primary and secondary teachers, who must make sure the transition is as smooth as possible. As an assistant head in a secondary school and lead on transition, I’ve seen a lot of students go through it. So, as the new school year approaches and with many primary teachers getting their young charges ready for the next step, here are a few reflections on what works well:

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Role for top schools in improvement

BBC - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 01:04
Top-performing council-run schools in England should be able to play a role in improving struggling schools, the Local Government Association says.
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Students 'turning to payday lenders'

BBC - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 00:57
Tens of thousands of students are relying on payday loans to cover their daily living costs, a survey suggests.
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Academies do not perform significantly better than local authority schools, says research

The Independent - Wed, 01/07/2015 - 00:01

Children in schools that have converted into academies do not perform significantly better than pupils in similar schools that choose to remain under local authority control, research suggests.











Categories: Education news feeds

Allison Pearson: Sparing the rod has spoilt these teachers

Telegraph - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 21:05
How about a harsh lesson for those teachers who act as if naughty children didn't exist?









Categories: Education news feeds

The Guardian view on the Tim Hunt affair: an explosive combination of science, sexism and social media | Editorial

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 20:41
Cyberstorms are just another form of bullying, and the best answer is a measured response

It is three weeks since Sir Tim Hunt, a Nobel prize winner, shared his sexist opinion of female scientists – distractingly sexy, prone to weep when criticised and best segregated at work – with a room full of science writers. His remarks were relayed into the Twittersphere by several of those present, including British-based science writer Connie St Louis. At once, he came under global and sometimes viciously personal attack on social media. He delivered a non-apology on BBC radio. According to his wife, also a senior scientist at UCL, it was made clear to her that to protect UCL’s reputation, he had to resign.

Within 24 hours of his after-dinner speech, he had gone. By the weekend, he was complaining to sympathisers that he had been hung out to dry, unleashing a wave of support that included famous colleagues such as Richard Dawkins and Brian Cox. Today Jonathan Dimbleby joined the protest. Next week, UCL’s council meets and the Hunt affair will once again be on the agenda. This bitter mix of resentments amplified by the polarising environment of social media should have met a calmer official response. But the professor still had to go.

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Extremists barred from university and college campuses as part of renewed crackdown

The Independent - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 19:31

Universities and colleges will be forced to vet external speakers for “extremist” views as part of a renewed crackdown on radicalisation, ministers have indicated.











Categories: Education news feeds

School governors to be on database

BBC - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 18:06
In response to the Trojan Horse allegations, a national database of of school governors in England is going to be created.
Categories: Education news feeds

Schools' new rules on extremism

BBC - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 17:32
Schools are given legal obligations to support counter-extremism, but teachers raise concerns over 'spying'.
Categories: Education news feeds

Universities minister doesn’t rule out raising tuition fees

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 17:30

Jo Johnson says government is committed to ‘stable funding regime’ when Labour invites him to banish talk of fees increase or changes to student loan terms

The new science and universities minister, Jo Johnson, has declined to rule out raising tuition fees or changing the terms of existing student loans over the next five years.

Johnson’s Labour counterpart, Liam Byrne, said in parliament on Tuesday that, after the coalition tripled tuition fees, four out of five students no longer thought that their university courses were value for money.

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Facebook helps students learn complex subjects - and should be used as a serious learning tool, study suggests

The Independent - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 15:35

Facebook helps students learn complex subjects – like science – and should possibly be used as a serious learning tool, a first-of-its-kind study has suggested.











Categories: Education news feeds

Dimbleby quits UCL over Tim Hunt row

BBC - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 14:02
Jonathan Dimbleby resigns from his honorary fellowship at University College London, in protest over its refusal to reinstate Prof Sir Tim Hunt.
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Campus ban on extremist speakers delayed

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 13:04

Lords row delays statutory checks on all external speakers at universities as new anti-radicalisation rules come in for the rest of the public sector

New counter-terror rules stipulating stringent checks on all external speakers at universities and further education colleges have been delayed and are now unlikely to come into force until the autumn.

The delay in the statutory ban on extremist speakers from campuses was confirmed as much of the rest of the public sector – including schools, local authorities, the police, prisons and probation services – is placed under a new legal duty to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism, from Wednesday.

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7/7 London bombings: victim's family vows to fight extremism in schools

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 12:31

Relatives of Miriam Hyman launch campaign to fight student radicalisation and promote social harmony in runup to 10th anniversary of attacks

The family of one of the victims of 7/7 has launched a campaign designed to tackle extremism in schools, days before the 10th anniversary of the attacks.

Miriam Hyman was one of 52 people killed on 7 July 2005, when the bus on which she was travelling was blown up by 18-year-old Hasib Hussain, one of four suicide bombers who attacked London’s transport network.

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Dimbleby resigns from UCL in protest at 'disgraceful' treatment of Sir Tim Hunt

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 12:03

Broadcaster and writer accuses London college of rush to judgment in forcing Nobel prize-winning scientist to quit over remarks about women

Jonathan Dimbleby has resigned from his honorary fellowship at University College London in protest at its treatment of biologist Sir Tim Hunt after he made controversial remarks about women in science.

The broadcaster and writer accused the college of a “disgraceful” rush to judgment in forcing the Nobel prize-winning scientist to quit his honorary fellowship at UCL and urged other fellows to help change the college’s mind.

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HEA Principal Fellows' Networking Event, June 2015

Higher Education Academy - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 11:37
Tuesday, 30 June, 2015

On Thursday 4 June HEA Principal Fellows gathered at the British Academy for a networking event. 

Categories: Education news feeds

How do I become … a paramedic

The Guardian Unlimited - Tue, 30/06/2015 - 11:16

There’s no set career route, but the ability to empathise and be adaptable are paramount in a job in which you never know what will happen next

On a zebra crossing one November night, Lynsey Grant saved my mother’s life. The paramedic was on secondment with the London Air Ambulance when she was dispatched across London to treat a woman who had been run over while crossing the road on her way home from work. The casualty was not expected to survive. Eighteen months on, thanks to the skills of Grant and her team she is home from hospital – disabled but, against all the odds, alive.

It’s a night Grant remembers with emotion, despite the myriad patients she has helped since then. “You can deal with really traumatic cases, but sometimes the things that upset you aren’t what you expect – it might be an elderly lady who has been assaulted or someone who is so grateful it really moves you,” she says. “When you get to the scene you are in clinical mode and don’t have time to think too much about the person lying there, but then later you might see their shoes on the road or a handbag with a make-up case inside and it really gets you that that was someone’s son or wife who got up that morning with no idea of what was about to happen to them. However many incidents you attend you never lose the sense of the human element.”

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Categories: Education news feeds